Ebola Response

Deaths to health workers accounted for six percent of all deaths confirmed as due to EVD, even to the end of the outbreaks. Over 500 health workers, including members of PSI affiliated unions, were killed in the line of duty. PSI is actively lobbying national governments, the ILO and WHO and working with health and allied care workers in our unions to rebuild health systems that can resist future outbreaks in the context of universal access to essential healthcare, which is the core of the post-2015 agenda for health.

Safe Workers Save Lives: PSI Health Priorities and Trade Union Response to the Ebola Virus Disease

21 September 2016
Photo: UNMEER/Martine Perret. Creative Commons

At the start of the Ebola crisis, PSI was contacted by its affiliates from the three most affected countries with the alarming news that health workers were dying on the workfloor. This update reports on the work that has taken place on the ground since the implementation of PSI's Ebola response strategy.

Foreword: PSI Health Priorities and Trade Union Response to the Ebola Virus Disease

19 September 2016
Photo: UNMEER/Simon Ruf. Creative Commons

PSI is concerned with the health of all workers, the special risks faced by health workers and the commitment of public service workers to provide quality health services to the populations they serve. Health is a public good, and ill-health is a fundamental humanitarian problem with political, economic and social causes and consequences. Good health is not only a social benefit to individuals and societies, but also contributes to economies because it plays an important role in productivity.

A global view on the impact of Ebola

10 August 2016
Photo: Giros 555. Creative Commons

From the moment the Ebola Virus Disease emerged in Guinea and made its way through Sierra Leone and Liberia, with short but adequately repressed upheavals in Senegal and Nigeria, it affected 28,616 people and caused 11,310 deaths. [This article is an extract from the 2016 update"PSI trade union response to the Ebola Virus Disease".]

Trade union Ebola response strategy

10 August 2016
Photo: Liberia health workers protest at ECOWAS

At the start of the Ebola crisis, PSI was contacted by its affiliates from the three most affected countries with the alarming news that health workers were dying on the work floor. [This article is an extract from the 2016 update "PSI trade union response to the Ebola Virus Disease".]

Work on the ground: three national action plans

10 August 2016
PSI-WAHSUN Conference on Ebola, November 2014.

The kick-off of our activities was a large consultation meeting in Ghana with the health unions from the three most affected countries Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. After an exercise on union challenges, opportunities and priorities, the unions started working on the analysis of their own national situation and the elaboration of a national action plan for their union.[This article is an extract from the 2016 update "PSI trade union response to the Ebola Virus Disease".]

Missing wages, hazard fees and family support

10 August 2016
Photo: UNICEF Guinea. Creative Commons

In the first stage of the strategy, the health unions focused on collecting information in order to elaborate their union demands on proven data. A survey was carried out to collect data on payment of wages and hazard fees to healthcare workers and the financial support for the families of deceased healthcare workers. [This article is an extract from the 2016 Update "PSI trade union response to the Ebola Virus Disease".]

Visits to the United States and the three most affected countries

10 August 2016
Photo: PSI delegation meets with Dr Toni Lewis (far left) and SEIU members. Photo:SEIU1199

The highlights of 2015 included lobbying in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, but also a wide range of activities at the United Nations and the United States, at the heart of international policy-making. [This article is an extract from the 2016 Update "PSI trade union response to the Ebola Virus Disease".]